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Hermès Paris has whispered the ultimate in luxury since 1837. Founded as a saddlery company by Thierry Hermès, the company produces scarves, ties, handbags, luggage, small leather goods, ready to wear clothing, home décor, jewelry, fragrances, and saddles. Leather goods account for nearly 30% of their revenue, with scarves contributing 12 percent and clothing 15 percent. Hermès continues to be 80 percent family owned, with the remaining 20 percent traded on the Paris Bourse.

One of the company’s most recognizable products, Hermès’ scarves are hand-printed using multiple silk screens and hand stitched. Hermès produced their first silk scarf in 1928 and over 25,000 designs have been released to date. The company currently creates two scarf collections per year — in addition to issuing reprints of earlier designs and special editions.

Many consider Hermès’ iconic handbags to be the ultimate luxury accessory. These coveted items are handmade, with one craftsman working on and completing a single bag. Taking up to 24 hours to create, they are crafted from fine leathers or exotic skins and the findings can include precious metals. Hermès bags have been seen on the arms of the world’s most fashionable and well known women. Their Kelly bag gained worldwide recognition in 1956 when Grace Kelly was photographed carrying one. Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis used both the Constance and Trim bags. The Birkin bag was specially designed for actress Jane Birkin and went on to become the most highly coveted handbag in history. The wait time for a Birkin bag can be up to two years, depending on the materials used to create it.

Hermès introduced their tie collection in 1949. In addition to both silk twill and heavy silk collections, the company also produces gavroches, pochettes and novelty styles. They release 30 silk twill designs each collection – including reprints of earlier designs in new colorways. Their heavy silk collection includes 15 new designs each season.

Starting with the fall 2004 collection, Jean Paul Gaultier became the head designer at Hermès. In May 2010, he announced he would be leaving the company. He was replaced by Christophe Lemaire.

Written by cosmiscowgirl

See vintage Hermès from VFG members on Etsy (paid link)


from an early 20th century jockey's cap - Courtesy of matthewenbray

from an early 20th century jockey’s cap

Courtesy of matthewenbray

from a 1960s tie - Courtesy of matthewenbray

from a 1960s tie

Courtesy of matthewenbray

from a late 1960s/early 1970s sweater  - Courtesy of safeasasparrow

from a late 1960s/early 1970s sweater

Courtesy of safeasasparrow

from a 1970s coat - Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 1970s coat

Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

signature inside a 1970s Kelly bag - Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

signature inside a 1970s Kelly bag

Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 1970s shirt - Courtesy of joules

from a 1970s shirt

Courtesy of joules

from a 1980s skirt - Courtesy of fuzzylizzie.com

from a 1980s skirt

Courtesy of fuzzylizzie.com

from a 1980s jacket - Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 1980s jacket

Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 1980s tie - Courtesy of matthewenbray

from a 1980s tie

Courtesy of matthewenbray

from a 1990s blouse  - Courtesy of fuzzylizzie.com

from a 1990s blouse

Courtesy of fuzzylizzie.com

from  1990s pants - Courtesy of claireshaeffer

from 1990s pants

Courtesy of claireshaeffer

signature from a 2000s Birkin bag - Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

signature from a 2000s Birkin bag

Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 2001 dress - Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 2001 dress

Courtesy of cosmiccowgirl

from a 2009 tie - Courtesy of antiquetrader

from a 2009 tie

Courtesy of antiquetrader

Fake 1970s Hermes label  - Courtesy of circavintage

Fake 1970s Hermes label

Courtesy of circavintage