Utility Label

The Utility Label or CC41, was used in Great Britain as a result of wartime shortages in WWII and the period immediately following. Rationing of clothing went into effect in June, 1941, and strict manufacturing standards were drawn up limiting the amount of fabric, fasteners and trims that could be used in each garment. This ruling was called Civilian Clothing 1941, or CC41.

The British Board of Trade enlisted the help of many of the country’s top designers, including Hardy Amies, Molyneux and Norman Hartnell to design samples that fit within the strict measures. These styles were then adapted for the mass market.

CC41 labeling continued until 1952, when rationing was finally ended.

See : cc41

Written by Lizzie Bramlett, fuzzylizzie.com


from a 1940s dress - Courtesy of ladieswholunch
from a 1940s dress
Courtesy of ladieswholunch
from a 1940s dress - Courtesy of catboxvintage
from a 1940s dress
Courtesy of catboxvintage
from a 1940s fur coat - Courtesy of chezmov
from a 1940s fur coat
Courtesy of chezmov
from a 1940s wool overcoat  - Courtesy of leonardo da vintage
from a 1940s wool overcoat
Courtesy of leonardo da vintage
from a 1940s cotton mens shirt - Courtesy Circa Vintage Clothing Melbourne
from a 1940s cotton mens shirt
Courtesy Circa Vintage Clothing Melbourne

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