Fabric

2 x 2 rib knit

Fabric Resource : 2 x 2 rib knit

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A knit fabric with vertical ridges on both faces made by alternating two wales drawn to the face and two wales drawn to the back of the knit, a process further described under rib knits. See also Rib Knits

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Knit fabrics

Fabric Resource : Accordion rib

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A knit fabric with vertical ridges (ribs) alternating on the face and reverse. 1 × 1 alternating with 2 × 2 is known as accordion rib, further described under rib knits. See also Rib knits

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Knit fabrics

Alaskine

Fabric Resource : Alaskine

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Lustrous and relatively crisp fabric of 35% silk and 65% wool, with the silk in the warp and the wool in the weft. The name Alaskine was trademarked in 1960, although used commercially starting in 1956. The trademark was cancelled in 2001. The elegant fabric was especially popular in the 1960s. Uses: Suits, formal wear, dresses

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Finer heavy fabrics

Assuit

Fabric Resource : Assuit

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Assuit is a netting fabric embroidered with metal. The embroidery is done by threading wide needles with flat strips of metal about 1/8” wide. The metal may be nickel silver, copper or brass, and it is threaded through the holes in the net, folded over, cut and flattened, making little packets of metal. When finished, the metal packets are further flattened by rolling and/or hammering over the fabric. The netting is made of cotton or

Fabric, Netting, Cotton or cotton-like, Trims - veils - interfacing, Top weight

Astrakhan

Fabric Resource : Astrakhan

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Astrakhan fabric is made to look like karakul (astrakhan, Persian) lamb fleece—with heavy, curly pile. The pile may be looped or cut. Any fiber may be used; lustrous wool is common. Uses: Coats, hats See also: Lamb-Sheep in the VFG Fur Resource

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Heavy weight, Thick furry pile fabrics

Fabric Resource : Balbriggan

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A jersey knit named for the town in Ireland where it was first made, balbriggan may be cotton, wool or a blend. It often has a soft, napped reverse. Balbriggan—or just bal—is also the name given to underwear made of it. Uses: Underwear, including long underwear See also: Jersey

Fabric, Top weight, Knit fabrics

1950s cotton bandanna print

Fabric Resource : Bandanna, bandana

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Although we now associate bandanna with a handkerchief of red or navy with a black and white pattern, a much older resist-dyed fabric from India is the progenitor of the mass-produced modern version. The name comes from the Hindi word bandhana meaning “to tie”—as in the preparation for dying the fabric. Tying small areas of a cotton cloth and then dying the fabric creates a tie-dye pattern of white spots in a darker ground. Bandanna

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Barathea (silk type)

Fabric Resource : Barathea, silk type

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Once a name with a registered trademark, barathea is a silk or silky manufactured fiber fabric with a broken rib weave. Note that wool barathea is unrelated. Uses: Ties, cravats, dresses

Fabric, Silk or silk-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Horizontally ribbed fabrics

Fabric Resource : Barathea, wool type

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A soft worsted suit fabric with a twill weave, barathea features a basket weave element: Two weft yarns cross each warp yarn. It can be called a basket twill or a hopsack twill. It is usually dyed black or deep blue. Note that silk barathea is unrelated. Uses: Coats, suits

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Finer heavy fabrics

Fabric Resource : Barkcloth, nonwoven

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A textile made by soaking and pounding the fibrous inner bark of trees, most often the paper mulberry. The fabric is nonwoven and paper-like, although it can be made thick and tough, as well as fine and delicate. The cloth takes dyes well and is often decorated with geometric patterns. A type of barkcloth, Tapa (called Kapa in Hawaii) is traditionally made by Pacific Islanders who make it to this day. Other types of barkcloth

Fabric, Fabrics made without knitting or weaving

Barkcloth

Fabric Resource : Barkcloth, woven

Saturday, June 22, 2013

A fabric with a crepe-like texture, woven barkcloth is actually a granite or momie weave textile, as compared to non-woven traditional barkcloth. The term barkcloth as applied to this type of fabric appears to date from the 1920s, and it is most associated with interior decorating in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. The fiber is cotton and the weight substantial. The texture is characteristic of the fabric—as are the decorative, bold patterns and colors—which truly

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Pattern- or pucker-textured fabrics

Batik-printed handwoven silk from India

Fabric Resource : Batik

Sunday, July 08, 2012

An ancient form of resist printing from Indonesia in which wax is used in patterns where dye is not desired. The wax resist is then removed and the process may continue, creating rich multicolored patterns—most often in blues, browns and oranges. Characteristic of batik are tiny lines where the wax has cracked and the dye has seeped into the resist pattern. This is not considered a flaw, rather part of the fabric’s distinct beauty. Originally

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Cotton batiste

Fabric Resource : Batiste

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Named for Jean Baptiste, a French weaver of the 13th century who wove fine linen cloth, batiste is now most commonly made of cotton or a cotton/polyester blend, The fabric is light and sheer, with lengthwise streaks. It is a balanced plain weave. When cotton is used, the soft, limp fabric is often mercerized to bolster its luster and strength. The fabric is often white, pale solids or delicate prints. There are also wool, silk

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Lightest open weave or sheer fabrics

Cotton bedford cord

Fabric Resource : Bedford cord

Sunday, July 08, 2012

In the piqué family but of heavier weight, bedford cord features vertical cords usually padded with stuffer yarns. It may be made of cotton or cotton blends—sometimes wool—or with a wool face and a cotton back. It is asserted that the fabric comes from New Bedford, Massachusetts (it had a thriving late 19th to early 20th century textile industry), hence its name. Uses: Riding habits, uniforms, slacks, suits, coats See also: Piqué Warp piqué

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Vertically ribbed fabrics, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Bengaline

Fabric Resource : Bengaline

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A plain weave fabric made with thicker (or grouped) weft yarns and fine and more numerous warp yarns. The result is a very noticeable horizontal rib with a silky surface. The weft is often cotton while the filament warp is silk or a manufactured fiber. The name is from Bengal, India. Uses: Dresses, coats, suits See also: Faille Grosgrain Ottoman Rep Taffeta

Fabric, Silk or silk-like, Bottom weight, Horizontally ribbed fabrics

Cotton birdseye piqué

Fabric Resource : Birdseye piqué

Sunday, July 08, 2012

One of the piqué fabrics, made in cotton or cotton blends and with a small, distinct raised pattern on its face. Birdseye piqué’s pattern is a tiny diamond shape, reminiscent of a bird’s eye. A similar but somewhat larger oval pattern is called bullseye piqué. Also written bird’s-eye piqué, bird’s eye piqué. Uses: Dresses, blouses, sportswear, children’s clothing See also: Piqué

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Fabric Resource : Bobbinet

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Before the invention of the bobbinet machine, netting was made by hand with bobbins. The bobbinet machine was invented by the Englishman John Heathcoat in 1806. He first called the fabric he produced “bobbin net.” Bobbinet is a hexagonal-mesh netting fabric, originally of silk, then also of cotton, rayon and (especially) nylon. Uses: Veils, trims, lace grounds, dresses, bridal wear See also: Cape net Illusion Point d’esprit Tulle

Fabric, Fabric Terms, Netting, Trims - veils - interfacing

Bouclé

Fabric Resource : Bouclé

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Characterized by loops on one or both sides, bouclé comes from the French word for “buckled,” “ringed” or “curled.” Some versions of the fabric combine looped sections with plain; others are looped all over. Most commonly wool—with mohair a fine choice for this treatment—bouclé may also be acrylic or other fibers. It may be woven or knitted. Uses: Coats, suits, sweaters See also: Bouclette Poodle cloth Ratiné Terry cloth

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Loop-textured fabrics

Bouclette

Fabric Resource : Bouclette

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Bouclette is the diminutive of bouclé (French for “buckled,” “ringed,” or “curled”) and features very small loops over the surface of the fabric. As with bouclé, it is usually made of wool, and its uses are similar. See also: Bouclé

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Loop-textured fabrics

Polyester bourrelet

Fabric Resource : Bourrelet

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A double knit fabric with a ribbed or corded look on its face. See also: Double knit, doubleknit

Fabric, Bottom weight, Knit fabrics

Cotton broadcloth

Fabric Resource : Broadcloth, cotton type

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Broadcloth is a shirt weight fabric most commonly made of cotton or cotton blends. It is plain weave with a very fine horizontal rib. In the U.K., broadcloth is virtually synonymous with poplin. In the U.S. and Canada, poplin is considered a heavier fabric. Cotton broadcloth was introduced from England in the 1920s, and as it was a fine poplin, it was given a name to distinguish it from poplin. Broadcloth was originally a name

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Light to medium weight fabrics, Horizontally ribbed fabrics

Wool broadcloth

Fabric Resource : Broadcloth, wool type

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Wool broadcloth is a fine twill weave woolen fabric (sometimes a wool blend) with a lustrous, velvety nap. Note that wool broadcloth is unrelated to cotton broadcloth. Uses: Suits, coats, uniforms See also: Fleece

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Finer heavy fabrics, Fabrics with a soft brushed feel

Rayon brocade, face

Fabric Resource : Brocade

Sunday, July 08, 2012

An elaborately-patterned fabric woven on a jacquard loom since the early 19th century, brocade uses color, texture or both to emphasize its figures. The figures and ground may be of contrasting weaves such as satin on plain weave. Brocade is not considered reversible; the reverse is often distinguished by long floating threads. Brocade was originally made in Asia, of silk with gold or silver threads, and it may still be silk or a manufactured filament

Fabric, Silk or silk-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Woven pattern fabrics: non-geometric

Brocatelle, suit-weight

Fabric Resource : Brocatelle

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A jacquard weave fabric related to brocade, brocatelle is thicker and heavier—with its figures in higher relief. Originally made of silk, the fabric may now be made of wool, cotton, silk, manufactured fibers, and combinations. As with brocade, it is not considered reversible. Uses: Interior decorating, lighter versions occasionally for clothing See also: Brocade

Fabric, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Woven pattern fabrics: non-geometric

Fabric Resource : Broché coutil

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Broché is a French term for brocade, or figured, and broché coutil is coutil with a jacquard pattern in its closely woven herringbone twill. Uses: Corsets See also: Coutil

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Brushed denim

Fabric Resource : Brushed denim

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Denim that has been given a soft brushed finish. See also: Denim

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Fabrics with a soft brushed feel

Buckram

Fabric Resource : Buckram

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A heavy, coarse, open plain weave fabric, buckram is usually made of cotton, linen or hemp, and is heavily sized. As an interfacing between the fabric and the lining of clothing, buckram is used to give structure to the garment, and it makes hat shapes and other accessories that require structured forms. Buckram is sometimes made by gluing two cotton fabrics together, then sizing as with the open-weave buckram. Uses: Millinery, interfacing, bookbinding See also:

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Trims - veils - interfacing, Very stiff open weave fabrics

Burlap

Fabric Resource : Burlap

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Burlap is a coarse, plain weave fabric woven from jute fibers. It is often left undyed, but can be dyed or printed. Burlap is called hessian in the UK and Europe. Gunny sack or gunny cloth is coarse burlap used for bagging. Uses: Bags for commodities such as rice; upholstery lining; when printed, used for draperies and wall coverings. Very rarely used for clothing. See also: Hopsacking

Fabric, Linen or linen-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Burn-out fabric

Fabric Resource : Burn-out fabric

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Burn-out (burned-out, burnt-out) fabric is woven of more than one fiber type, then printed with a chemical that will destroy the surface fiber, leaving the ground intact. The result is a fabric patterned with a distinct surface and ground. The ground is usually sheer. Velvet is probably the most common type of burn-out fabric. Dévoré (literally “devoured”) velvet is synonymous. Uses: Evening wear, bridal, scarves See also: Burn-out velvet Dévoré velvet Façonné velvet Velvet

Fabric, Fabric Terms, Silk or silk-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Burn-out velvet

Fabric Resource : Burn-out velvet

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Velvet woven of two fibers, printed with a chemical that destroys one of the fibers, leaving a pile/ground pattern. Dévoré velvet is synonymous. See also: Burn-out fabric Dévoré velvet Façonné velvet Velvet

Fabric, Top weight, Pile and treated-pile fabrics

Butcher cloth with machine embroidery

Fabric Resource : Butcher cloth

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Butcher cloth is rayon or rayon/cotton, spun and woven to resemble linen with linen-like slubs. Butcher cloth used to be called butcher linen, but that is no longer correct according to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission. Uses: Dresses, suits, skirts See also: Butcher linen Linen

Fabric, Linen or linen-like, Bottom weight, Slub-textured fabrics

Butcher linen

Fabric Resource : Butcher linen

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Sturdy, heavy, bleached linen, with linen’s balanced plain weave and slubs. Butcher linen can now also be made of cotton. The name butcher linen used to be used (misleadingly) for a linen-like rayon or rayon/cotton blend fabric—but the current name for this type of fabric is butcher cloth. Uses: Aprons, tablecloths See also: Butcher cloth Linen

Fabric, Linen or linen-like, Bottom weight, Slub-textured fabrics

Calico

Fabric Resource : Calico

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Calico is a cotton or cotton blend fabric with a long history and distinct meanings in the U.S. and U.K. The fabric was first made of cotton in Calicut (Kozhikode), India, and there it was block printed with intricate designs. In the U.S. the fabric evolved into a relatively inexpensive fabric with small machine-printed patterns, usually flowers. In the U.K., calico is a plain weave cotton cloth, white or unbleached. Uses: The printed calico used

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Cambric (linen)

Fabric Resource : Cambric

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A soft, plain weave fabric originally made from linen, now usually of cotton. It is named for the French city of Cambrai—a linen center since medieval times. The fabric is calendered to give it a glossy finish. On its finer side, cambric is much like lawn or batiste, while in its heavier weight (called “lining cambric”), it can be similar to fine muslin. Uses: Handkerchiefs, shirts, aprons, dresses, lingerie. Lining cambric is used for linings.

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Light to medium weight fabrics

Cotton canvas

Fabric Resource : Canvas

Sunday, July 08, 2012

The name canvas comes from Latin for hemp—cannabis—as canvas was originally made of hemp or linen. Now it is usually cotton or linen. Canvas is virtually synonymous with duck which is a strong, firm, plain weave fabric. Many grades, weights and qualities are made. A 2/1 weave canvas is also made. Uses: Sails, artists’ paint surface, workwear, utility wear, sportswear, tents, embroidery ground See also: Duck

Fabric, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Cape net, photo taken inside of hat

Fabric Resource : Cape net

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

A heavily-sized leno weave netting used to give shape to hats. The netting has fairly squared mesh. The stiffness of the fabric comes from sizing with starch or similar; it is flexible when wet, stiff once dry. Rice net is synonymous. Use: Hats See also: Buckram

Fabric, Trims - veils - interfacing, Very stiff open weave fabrics

Cavalry twill

Fabric Resource : Cavalry twill

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A sturdy, resilient fabric named for its use in making riding pants for cavalry uniforms. Cavalry twill can be recognized by its pronounced double twill line. It is woven in a steep right hand twill. The best is made of wool or worsted, but cavalry twill can be made of blends including cotton, rayon and manufactured fibers. Uses: Riding and ski pants, uniforms, sportswear, slacks, coats, suits See also: Whipcord

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Fabrics with clear diagonal ribs

Wool challis

Fabric Resource : Challis

Sunday, July 08, 2012

The name challis comes from the Anglo-Indian word “shalee,” meaning soft. Challis is indeed a very soft fabric, particularly fine in wool. It may be made of wool, rayon, cotton or manufactured fiber blends, and was originally made (1832) in Norwich, England, of silk and worsted. Characteristically in a light and open plain weave, although twill challis may be found. Challis is one of the few printed wools with the most common prints being floral

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Top weight, Light to medium weight fabrics

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