Cotton or cotton-like

Assuit

Fabric Resource : Assuit

Tuesday, September 04, 2012

Assuit is a netting fabric embroidered with metal. The embroidery is done by threading wide needles with flat strips of metal about 1/8” wide. The metal may be nickel silver, copper or brass, and it is threaded through the holes in the net, folded over, cut and flattened, making little packets of metal. When finished, the metal packets are further flattened by rolling and/or hammering over the fabric. The netting is made of cotton or

Fabric, Netting, Cotton or cotton-like, Trims - veils - interfacing, Top weight

1950s cotton bandanna print

Fabric Resource : Bandanna, bandana

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Although we now associate bandanna with a handkerchief of red or navy with a black and white pattern, a much older resist-dyed fabric from India is the progenitor of the mass-produced modern version. The name comes from the Hindi word bandhana meaning “to tie”—as in the preparation for dying the fabric. Tying small areas of a cotton cloth and then dying the fabric creates a tie-dye pattern of white spots in a darker ground. Bandanna

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Barkcloth

Fabric Resource : Barkcloth, woven

Saturday, June 22, 2013

A fabric with a crepe-like texture, woven barkcloth is actually a granite or momie weave textile, as compared to non-woven traditional barkcloth. The term barkcloth as applied to this type of fabric appears to date from the 1920s, and it is most associated with interior decorating in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s. The fiber is cotton and the weight substantial. The texture is characteristic of the fabric—as are the decorative, bold patterns and colors—which truly

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Pattern- or pucker-textured fabrics

Batik-printed handwoven silk from India

Fabric Resource : Batik

Sunday, July 08, 2012

An ancient form of resist printing from Indonesia in which wax is used in patterns where dye is not desired. The wax resist is then removed and the process may continue, creating rich multicolored patterns—most often in blues, browns and oranges. Characteristic of batik are tiny lines where the wax has cracked and the dye has seeped into the resist pattern. This is not considered a flaw, rather part of the fabric’s distinct beauty. Originally

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Cotton batiste

Fabric Resource : Batiste

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Named for Jean Baptiste, a French weaver of the 13th century who wove fine linen cloth, batiste is now most commonly made of cotton or a cotton/polyester blend, The fabric is light and sheer, with lengthwise streaks. It is a balanced plain weave. When cotton is used, the soft, limp fabric is often mercerized to bolster its luster and strength. The fabric is often white, pale solids or delicate prints. There are also wool, silk

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Lightest open weave or sheer fabrics

Cotton bedford cord

Fabric Resource : Bedford cord

Sunday, July 08, 2012

In the piqué family but of heavier weight, bedford cord features vertical cords usually padded with stuffer yarns. It may be made of cotton or cotton blends—sometimes wool—or with a wool face and a cotton back. It is asserted that the fabric comes from New Bedford, Massachusetts (it had a thriving late 19th to early 20th century textile industry), hence its name. Uses: Riding habits, uniforms, slacks, suits, coats See also: Piqué Warp piqué

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Vertically ribbed fabrics, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Cotton birdseye piqué

Fabric Resource : Birdseye piqué

Sunday, July 08, 2012

One of the piqué fabrics, made in cotton or cotton blends and with a small, distinct raised pattern on its face. Birdseye piqué’s pattern is a tiny diamond shape, reminiscent of a bird’s eye. A similar but somewhat larger oval pattern is called bullseye piqué. Also written bird’s-eye piqué, bird’s eye piqué. Uses: Dresses, blouses, sportswear, children’s clothing See also: Piqué

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Cotton broadcloth

Fabric Resource : Broadcloth, cotton type

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Broadcloth is a shirt weight fabric most commonly made of cotton or cotton blends. It is plain weave with a very fine horizontal rib. In the U.K., broadcloth is virtually synonymous with poplin. In the U.S. and Canada, poplin is considered a heavier fabric. Cotton broadcloth was introduced from England in the 1920s, and as it was a fine poplin, it was given a name to distinguish it from poplin. Broadcloth was originally a name

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Light to medium weight fabrics, Horizontally ribbed fabrics

Fabric Resource : Broché coutil

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Broché is a French term for brocade, or figured, and broché coutil is coutil with a jacquard pattern in its closely woven herringbone twill. Uses: Corsets See also: Coutil

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Brushed denim

Fabric Resource : Brushed denim

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Denim that has been given a soft brushed finish. See also: Denim

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Fabrics with a soft brushed feel

Buckram

Fabric Resource : Buckram

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A heavy, coarse, open plain weave fabric, buckram is usually made of cotton, linen or hemp, and is heavily sized. As an interfacing between the fabric and the lining of clothing, buckram is used to give structure to the garment, and it makes hat shapes and other accessories that require structured forms. Buckram is sometimes made by gluing two cotton fabrics together, then sizing as with the open-weave buckram. Uses: Millinery, interfacing, bookbinding See also:

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Trims - veils - interfacing, Very stiff open weave fabrics

Calico

Fabric Resource : Calico

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Calico is a cotton or cotton blend fabric with a long history and distinct meanings in the U.S. and U.K. The fabric was first made of cotton in Calicut (Kozhikode), India, and there it was block printed with intricate designs. In the U.S. the fabric evolved into a relatively inexpensive fabric with small machine-printed patterns, usually flowers. In the U.K., calico is a plain weave cotton cloth, white or unbleached. Uses: The printed calico used

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Printed pattern fabrics

Cambric (linen)

Fabric Resource : Cambric

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A soft, plain weave fabric originally made from linen, now usually of cotton. It is named for the French city of Cambrai—a linen center since medieval times. The fabric is calendered to give it a glossy finish. On its finer side, cambric is much like lawn or batiste, while in its heavier weight (called “lining cambric”), it can be similar to fine muslin. Uses: Handkerchiefs, shirts, aprons, dresses, lingerie. Lining cambric is used for linings.

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Light to medium weight fabrics

Chambray

Fabric Resource : Chambray

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Chambray gets its name from Cambrai, a linen weaving town in Northern France where the fabric was first made. Originally linen, chambray is now usually cotton or a cotton blend. It is characterized by dyed warp yarns and undyed (white) weft yarns. It is a plain weave fabric and can be found in light to moderately heavy weights. The variations include stripes and checks as well as dobby-woven patterns. Uses: Shirts, children’s clothing, dresses, skirts

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Light to medium weight fabrics

Cheesecloth

Fabric Resource : Cheesecloth

Sunday, July 08, 2012

In the U.S., cheesecloth is the name of sheer, soft, loosely-woven bleached gauze fabric used for non-clothing purposes such as bandaging, dust cloths, and pressing cheese, butter and meat. In the U.K., cheesecloth is a light shirting weight soft cotton which is most often bleached but can be dyed, and is characterized by a crinkled texture. See also: Gauze Muslin Cotton crepe Cotton georgette

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Lightest open weave or sheer fabrics

Chino

Fabric Resource : Chino

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Most commonly khaki tan mercerized cotton, chino is always twilled on its face (either left- or right-hand twill) with a plain back. It is a durable, rugged fabric, known for being used by the U.S. and British armies for summer weight uniforms. The fabric originally came from China, later was exported to China from England, and was purchased by the U.S. Army stationed in the Philippines prior to WWI. The name chino apparently comes from

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Fabrics with clear diagonal ribs

Chintz

Fabric Resource : Chintz

Sunday, July 08, 2012

The characteristic print of chintz is a large floral pattern, and the finish is glossy from glazing. It is of cotton or a cotton blend, in a plain weave. The glaze can be starch or wax (both temporary finishes), or a more durable chemical resin. Unprinted but glazed fabrics are sometimes called chintz today. Chintz was originally made in India. The Indian name for the fabric was chint (plural chints), and the classic 17th century

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Lustrous or glossy fabrics

Corduroy

Fabric Resource : Corduroy

Sunday, July 08, 2012

There is argument about the derivation of the name corduroy, with many claiming it got its name from the French corde du roi, or King’s cord, and that it was used for the clothing of servants in French royal households in the 17th and 18th centuries. It may have been a form of marketing (wear a fabric worn in the presence of French nobility!) by an English entrepreneur. Whatever the origin of its name, corduroy

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Vertically ribbed fabrics

Fabric Resource : Cotton crepe

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A crepe-textured lightweight cotton fabric, with the crepe texture achieved either through the use of crepe twist yarns or the treatment of the fabric with caustic soda. The caustic soda causes yarns to shrink, puckering the fabric. The result can be a crepe texture, a crinkled texture, or an even pattern such as dots or stripes. When caustic soda is applied in stripes, the result is plissé. See also: Crepe Plissé Caustic soda crepe Cotton

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Pattern- or pucker-textured fabrics

Fabric Resource : Cotton georgette

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A British term for a crepe-textured cotton fabric made of long staple cotton, the crepe texture achieved by the use of Z- and S-twist yarns, similar to silk georgette. Uses: Blouses, dresses, skirts See also: Georgette Crinkled gauze Cotton crepe

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Pattern- or pucker-textured fabrics

Coutil

Fabric Resource : Coutil

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Exceptionally strong, closely woven cotton or cotton and rayon blend fabric usually with a herringbone twill weave. The name is French, derived from “drill.” Uses: Corsets, brasseries See also: Broché coutil Drill

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Crepon

Fabric Resource : Crepon

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Crepon and its close cousin bark crepe are characterized by lengthwise wrinkles. Bark crepe resembles the bark of a tree and is usually cotton, linen or rayon. Crepon, too, has a sturdy, vertically-rippled textured and may be silk, manufactured fiber, wool or cotton. The fabrics are compound fabrics, woven on dobby or jacquard looms. Uses: Dresses, blouses, suits, interior decorating See also: Matelasse

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Pattern- or pucker-textured fabrics

Plain weave crinkled cotton gauze

Fabric Resource : Crinkled gauze

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Gauze that has been given a wrinkled texture in the finishing process, usually mechanically, but also by the shrinking of high twist yarns. Similarly crinkled cotton fabric can also be seen in a heavier muslin sheeting weight, called crinkled muslin in the U.S. Uses: Loose-fitting, unstructured garments, most often blouses and dresses See also: Gauze Crepon Muslin

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Pattern- or pucker-textured fabrics

Crossbar dimity

Fabric Resource : Crossbar dimity

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A plain weave, sheer fabric with ribs at regular intervals in both directions (the warp and weft). The ribs are made by weaving two or more threads together as one. Crossbar dimity is made of cotton or a cotton blend and may be printed or plain. The name dimity is derived from the Greek dimitos, double thread. Tissue gingham is crossbar dimity outlining gingham checks. Uses: Dresses, blouses, skirts, aprons, lingerie, curtains See also: Dimity

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Damask (silk)

Fabric Resource : Damask

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Damask differs from its jacquard relative brocade in that it can be reversed, although the reverse will feature the woven-in pattern in “negative.” Damask is characteristically one color but two different weaves, to set the patterns apart from the ground. If the pattern is satin on the face, it will be dull on the reverse. If two colors are used, these will be reversed on the back of the fabric. The fabric gets its name

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Silk or silk-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Woven pattern fabrics: non-geometric

Denim

Fabric Resource : Denim

Tuesday, August 20, 2013

A rugged cotton or cotton blend fabric in a right- or left-hand twill weave. It was traditionally made with warp yarn dyed indigo blue with the weft left undyed. Indigo dye faded badly, which became one of denims charms. Available in many colors now, but indigo blue (usually synthetic dye at present) is far and away the most popular. Another beloved trait of denim is its softening over time. Many techniques have been employed to

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Fabrics with clear diagonal ribs

Dimity

Fabric Resource : Dimity

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A sheer plain weave fabric, dimity is characterized by vertical ribs at regular intervals. These warp ribs are formed by joining two or more threads together and weaving them as one. Always cotton originally—now in cotton blends as well—dimity may be plain or printed. The name is derived from the Greek dimitos, double thread. Crossbar dimity has the same occasional rib, but in both directions. Uses: Dresses, blouses, skirts, aprons, lingerie, curtains See also: Crossbar

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Vertically ribbed fabrics

Dotted swiss, clip spot, face

Fabric Resource : Dotted swiss

Saturday, June 01, 2013

Traditionally made of a fine plain weave cotton—now sometimes a blend with manufactured fiber—dotted swiss always is covered in small dots placed at regular intervals. These can be woven in, flocked or printed. Colors may be introduced, although the most common is all white. The original and finest was first made in Switzerland on a swivel loom. Other woven varieties are clip-spot (spot-dot, clip-dot or American dotted swiss) and lappet woven. Flocked dots are made

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked, Printed pattern fabrics

Drill

Fabric Resource : Drill

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Sturdy, medium to heavy cotton fabric with a tightly woven twill weave. Drill is often a 3/1 left-hand twill and it can also can be 2/1, or right-hand twill. It may be found in a herringbone pattern of alternating twill directions. The fabric can be unbleached, bleached, dyed or printed (such as in ticking stripes). The name comes from the Latin trilex, meaning three threads. Uses: Work wear, uniforms, sportswear, pocket and shoe linings See

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Fabrics with clear diagonal ribs

Duck, 2/1 weave

Fabric Resource : Duck

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A broad category of strong, closely constructed plain weave fabrics. The term duck is often used interchangeably with canvas. It is available in very firm heavy weights, as well as softer, lighter weights. Duck is most often cotton, but can sometimes be a cotton blend or linen. It can be unbleached, bleached, printed or dyed. There seems to be some discrepancy about the name duck, with various sources claiming it resists water like a duck,

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Eyelet

Fabric Resource : Eyelet

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Characterized by small cut outs surrounded by embroidery, eyelet is a summery material because of this “air conditioning.” The base fabric is usually a plain weave, light but firm cotton or cotton blend—most commonly in white—but also in pastels or any other color. Sometimes linen is used. Uses: Summer dresses, skirts, blouses, lingerie, trim, household decoration See also: Madeira work

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Non-netting fabrics with open patterns

Featherwale polyester/cotton-blend corduroy

Fabric Resource : Featherwale corduroy

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Also called feathercord and fine-wale corduroy, featherwale can have between 18 (or 21) and 21 (or 25) cords per inch. There is some discrepancy in sources as to the number of wales per inch, but none in that this is the corduroy with the narrowest wales. Uses: Dresses, shirts See also: Corduroy

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Vertically ribbed fabrics

Cotton flannel

Fabric Resource : Flannel, cotton

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A cotton or cotton blend fabric made with thicker weft threads, and napped on one or (more often) both sides. It is a soft and warm fabric, and is made in light to heavy weights. Uses: Baby clothes, sleepwear, shirts, sportswear, dresses, linings, sheets See also: Flannel, wool

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Fabrics with a soft brushed feel

Fabric Resource : Flannelette

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Flannelette is a lightweight cotton flannel fabric, formerly often twilled (and stronger), now usually plain weave. It is napped on one or both sides. Uses: Baby clothes, nightwear, sheets See also: Flannel, cotton

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Fabrics with a soft brushed feel

Plain weave printed cotton gauze

Fabric Resource : Gauze

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Soft, limp fabric with a loose, airy weave. Usually cotton, gauze was originally made of silk in the city of Gaza in the Middle East. It can be found in cotton blends, wool, silk, acetate or rayon. Plain or leno weave may be used. If stiffened with sizing, the fabric may be referred to as scrim. Uses: Loose-fitting, unstructured garments, most often blouses and dresses. In the U.K. and Australia, gauze refers to surgical bandaging

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Lightest open weave or sheer fabrics

Gingham

Fabric Resource : Gingham

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A light to medium weight balanced plain weave fabric usually of cotton or a cotton blend, gingham is most characteristically one color with white in even checks, called gingham checks. Tissue (very lightweight) gingham can have corded edges between the colors (see crossbar dimity). The name gingham is thought to come from the Malay ging-gang, meaning “striped.” Uses: Dresses, blouses, house dresses, aprons, pajamas See also: Check Crossbar dimity Shepherd’s check

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Fabric Resource : Honeycomb

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Honeycomb is a fabric that resembles a real honeycomb in having raised ridges and hollows. It is related to all the other fabrics with small dobby-woven textures, and is very similar to waffle cloth. See also: Birdseye piqué Huckaback Piqué Waffle cloth

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

Huckaback face

Fabric Resource : Huckaback

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Dobby woven and with a small textured pattern, huckaback is an absorbent fabric, usually of cotton and in narrow widths ideal for hand towels. It may have a pattern or word (think hotel name) woven into one end. Huckaback’s texture also makes a good ground for embroidery. It is related to all the other fabrics with small dobby-woven textures. Use: Hand towels See also: Birdseye piqué Honeycomb Piqué Waffle cloth

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Top weight, Bottom weight, Woven pattern fabrics: even - geometric - checked

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