Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Burlap

Fabric Resource : Burlap

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Burlap is a coarse, plain weave fabric woven from jute fibers. It is often left undyed, but can be dyed or printed. Burlap is called hessian in the UK and Europe. Gunny sack or gunny cloth is coarse burlap used for bagging. Uses: Bags for commodities such as rice; upholstery lining; when printed, used for draperies and wall coverings. Very rarely used for clothing. See also: Hopsacking

Fabric, Linen or linen-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Cotton canvas

Fabric Resource : Canvas

Sunday, July 08, 2012

The name canvas comes from Latin for hemp—cannabis—as canvas was originally made of hemp or linen. Now it is usually cotton or linen. Canvas is virtually synonymous with duck which is a strong, firm, plain weave fabric. Many grades, weights and qualities are made. A 2/1 weave canvas is also made. Uses: Sails, artists’ paint surface, workwear, utility wear, sportswear, tents, embroidery ground See also: Duck

Fabric, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Fabric Resource : Cheviot

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Originally made from the coarse, thick wool of cheviot sheep (named for the Cheviot Hills on the Scottish-English border), cheviot can now be made of other wool, wool blends, and manufactured fibers. The fabric is heavy, fulled and rough, with a hairy nap. It can be made in various weaves including twill and herringbone. Uses: Coats, jackets, suits See also: Donegal tweed Harris tweed Tweed

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Wool chinchilla cloth

Fabric Resource : Chinchilla cloth

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Constructed like fleece with a long nap, chinchilla cloth is given a machine finish which rubs the nap into nubs. It is made of wool or wool blends, and the warp may be cotton for strength. The town of Chinchilla, Spain, is where the present fabric was first made. Uses: Coats, hats See also: Fleece

Fabric, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Wool doeskin

Fabric Resource : Doeskin

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Doeskin is a medium-weight wool fabric with a short, soft nap and a tightly woven structure. It is similar to duvetyn, but lighter; usually softer and less densely napped than melton; softer and with a shorter nap than fleece. Despite doeskin’s softness it is hardwearing due to its compact weave. Rayon doeskin is a twilled fabric with one side napped, and there is also a heavy twilled cotton doeskin with one napped side. All three

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Duck, 2/1 weave

Fabric Resource : Duck

Sunday, July 08, 2012

A broad category of strong, closely constructed plain weave fabrics. The term duck is often used interchangeably with canvas. It is available in very firm heavy weights, as well as softer, lighter weights. Duck is most often cotton, but can sometimes be a cotton blend or linen. It can be unbleached, bleached, printed or dyed. There seems to be some discrepancy about the name duck, with various sources claiming it resists water like a duck,

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Wool duvetyn

Fabric Resource : Duvetyn, blanket cloth

Sunday, July 08, 2012

The name duvetyn comes from the French word duvet, meaning down. Wool or wool-blend commonly, the finish is napped, sheared and fulled. This creates a downy nap which covers its weave which is usually right-hand twill. It is softer and more lustrous, though its nap isn’t quite as long as that of fleece. Cotton duvetyn is usually called suede cloth. Uses: Coats, uniforms, suits; the heavier blanket cloth for blankets and Hudson’s Bay “point” blanket

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Wool fleece

Fabric Resource : Fleece

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Fleece is made of wool, mohair (as well as other specialty hairs) and blends. The nap covers the fabric’s construction which is usually right-hand twill or satin weave. With its soft nap all brushed in one direction, woven fleece has a longer, hairier nap than duvetyn. Uses: Coats, hats See also: Duvetyn Sweatshirt fleece

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Harris tweed in a twill weave, 1950s

Fabric Resource : Harris tweed, fabric

Sunday, July 08, 2012

All tweed labeled Harris must have the official orb and cross certification mark, and it can not have that mark unless it is “cloth that has been handwoven by the islanders of Lewis, Harris, Uist and Barra in their homes, using pure virgin wool that has been dyed and spun in the Outer Hebrides” (from the Harris Tweed Authority website). For centuries the Scottish islanders produced tweeds, but the Harris Tweed certification mark was first

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Homespun (wool)

Fabric Resource : Homespun

Sunday, July 08, 2012

So called because it was originally handwoven from hand-spun wool yarns, homespun is a loose, plain weave fabric characterized by uneven, coarse yarns. In spirit it is much like tweed, and is sometimes sold as tweed, but technically it is a plain weave (while tweed is usually a twill weave). Cotton and cotton blend homespun is also available, with the same basic characteristics but used for drapery and upholstery fabric. Uses: Coats, suits, lighter weights

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Wool hopsacking

Fabric Resource : Hopsacking

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Coarse jute or hemp woven in a basket weave. In Great Britain, where basket weave is called hopsack weave, the fabric was originally used for bagging hops. Rough basket weave fabric of wool can be called hopsacking, as can fabrics of various fibers that look like hopsacking. Uses for jute and hemp hopsacking: Bags for commodities, interior decoration Uses for wool and other fibers: Apparel See also: Burlap Monk’s cloth

Fabric, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Fabric Resource : Loden

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Made for a millenium, loden was first (and still) made in the Tyrol mountains of Austria. It is a sturdy woven wool fabric that is heavily fulled for weather resistance. First made of coarse wool from mountain sheep, the name is derived from Old High German loda, hair cloth. Traditionally black, red or white, a deep olive green color more recently popular became known as loden green. Uses: Outerwear See also: Melton

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Mackinaw

Fabric Resource : Mackinaw, mackinac

Sunday, July 08, 2012

The classic lumberman’s jacket fabric, mackinaw gets its name from Fort Mackinac (the pronunciation is mackinaw), where heavy wool blankets were traded by Europeans with Native Americans. Mackinaw is thick, napped, often twilled fabric, and can be single or double cloth. It is usually wool and reclaimed wool, sometimes with cotton. Quite often mackinaw is in an outsize check or plaid. Buffalo check is a term now used to describe such a big-checked pattern on

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Melton

Fabric Resource : Melton

Sunday, July 08, 2012

Melton looks much like thick felt with its twill weave or plain weave obscured by fulling and shearing of its nap (although the back of the fabric may show its weave). The dense, thick construction makes it wind and rain resistant and extremely warm. It is almost always dyed a solid color. The best melton is all wool and almost velvety. Less costly variations can have a cotton warp and woolen weft, and sometimes manufactured

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Fabric Resource : Mohair

Sunday, July 08, 2012

1) Long, lustrous fibers from the Angora goat, stronger than wool. 2) Spongy, plain-weave fabric made in a mixture of mohair and wool. From Fabric Sewing Guide by Claire Schaeffer. Krause Publications, Cincinnati, 2008. Used by permission.

Fabric, Fabric Terms, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Monkscloth

Fabric Resource : Monk's cloth

Sunday, July 08, 2012

This natural oatmeal cotton fabric is woven in a 4/4 basket weave (there may be more than four yarns in each direction), making for a rough, heavy, coarse and saggy cloth. It may have gotten the name from being used in monasteries as a penitent’s sack cloth garment. It was originally also made of flax, jute or hemp. The fabric is less commonly dyed or woven in stripes or plaids. Also called abbot’s cloth, belfry

Fabric, Cotton or cotton-like, Bottom weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Woolen tweed, twill weave

Fabric Resource : Tweed

Sunday, July 08, 2012

With origins along the Tweed River bordering England and Scotland, the name tweed now is associated with a long list of fabrics, characteristically woolens, but also wool/manufactured fiber blends. The original tweeds were hairy and rough, now they are usually shaved, flattened and fulled in the finishing process. Still characteristic is the fairly coarse wool from which it is made. Tweeds are usually in twill or plain weave, also seen is herringbone and basket weave.

Fabric, Wool or wool-like, Bottom weight, Heavy weight, Coarser or thick heavy fabrics

Apply for Membership

web design © 2014 lucidcrew